Payment Card Industry (PCI DSS)

Target Corporation has reached an $18.5 million settlement with 47 states and the District of Columbia to resolve the investigation into the retailer’s 2013 data breach, officials announced on May 23, 2017. The 2013 data breach incident triggered various state consumer protection and data breach laws when hackers accessed consumer data for over 110 million Target customers. In response, state attorneys general from across the country joined in an investigation led by Connecticut and Illinois. The investigation has culminated in the largest multistate data breach settlement to date.

In November 2013, hackers breached Target’s gateway server using stolen credentials from a third-party vendor. The hackers were able to access a customer service database, install malware on the system, and capture consumer data. Customer payment card accounts for more than 41 million and contact information for more than 60 million, including full names, telephone numbers, email and mailing addresses, payment card numbers and verification codes, and encrypted debit PINs, were compromised in the breach.

Notably, Target has agreed to much more than the monetary payments to the states. Through Target’s compliance with the settlement agreement, various state attorneys general project Target will set industry standards for secure credit card processing and customer data maintenance. According to the settlement terms, Target must adhere to several requirements, including: (1) developing, implementing, and maintaining a comprehensive information security program within 180 days designed to protect customer personal information; (2) employing an executive or officer responsible for implementing and maintaining the information security program; (3) developing and implementing policies and procedures for auditing vendor compliance with its information security program; (4) maintaining encryption protocols and policies; (5) complying with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (“PCI DSS”) with respect to its payment card system; (6) segmenting its payment card system from its larger computer network; (7) deploying and maintaining controls to detect and prevent the execution of unauthorized applications within its point-of-sale terminals and servers; and (8) adopting improved, industry-accepted payment card security technologies, such as chip and PIN technology.

Target has one year to obtain a third-party security assessment and report and provide the report to the Connecticut Attorney General’s Office.

A copy of the full settlement is available here.